Thursday, November 5, 2015

This is Worth Reproducing-01


  Reproduction

Malignant Tapeworm Cells Invade Human Host

By Larry M. Baddour, MD
Dr. Baddour is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.
A case report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that cells from a tapeworm could undergo malignant transformation and ultimately invade a human host's tissue.
Hymenolepis nana is a human tapeworm that can complete its life cycle in the small intestine; infection can proliferate for years. Development of extraintestinal H. nana infection in a 41-year-old HIV-infected man from Colombia prompted an investigation to determine whether malignant transformation had occurred in the parasite, causing invasive disease in the host.
Initial examination of the patient revealed extensive lymphadenopathy; stool testing yielded H. nana eggs. Disease progressed despite albendazole and antiretroviral therapy, and the patient died. Researchers performed numerous studies on samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies.
PCR screening demonstrated 99% sequence homology with H. nana. Further analysis supported a cestode origin of the cells. Genomic sequencing demonstrated H. nana variants that were consistent with mutations seen in cancer.
Descriptors such as "diagnostic conundrum," "surprising," and "unexpectedly" are rarely seen in case reports. The apparent novelty of this case and the extensive laboratory work performed in this unique investigation make me wonder whether host-related malignant transformation of H. nana might have occurred previously but not been recognized. Should a retrospective analysis of tissue from other immunocompromised hosts be performed?

Malignant Tapeworm Cells Invade Human Host


By Larry M. Baddour, MD
Dr. Baddour is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.
A case report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that cells from a tapeworm could undergo malignant transformation and ultimately invade a human host's tissue.
Hymenolepis nana is a human tapeworm that can complete its life cycle in the small intestine; infection can proliferate for years. Development of extraintestinal H. nana infection in a 41-year-old HIV-infected man from Colombia prompted an investigation to determine whether malignant transformation had occurred in the parasite, causing invasive disease in the host.
Initial examination of the patient revealed extensive lymphadenopathy; stool testing yielded H. nana eggs. Disease progressed despite albendazole and antiretroviral therapy, and the patient died. Researchers performed numerous studies on samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies.
PCR screening demonstrated 99% sequence homology with H. nana. Further analysis supported a cestode origin of the cells. Genomic sequencing demonstrated H. nana variants that were consistent with mutations seen in cancer.
Descriptors such as "diagnostic conundrum," "surprising," and "unexpectedly" are rarely seen in case reports. The apparent novelty of this case and the extensive laboratory work performed in this unique investigation make me wonder whether host-related malignant transformation of H. nana might have occurred previously but not been recognized. Should a retrospective analysis of tissue from other immunocompromised hosts be performed?
- See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/fw110816/2015/11/05/malignant-tapeworm-cells-invade-human-host?query=pfwTOC&jwd=000012045846&jspc=CLP#sthash.V2U8uEMo.dpuf

Malignant Tapeworm Cells Invade Human Host


By Larry M. Baddour, MD
Dr. Baddour is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.
A case report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that cells from a tapeworm could undergo malignant transformation and ultimately invade a human host's tissue.
Hymenolepis nana is a human tapeworm that can complete its life cycle in the small intestine; infection can proliferate for years. Development of extraintestinal H. nana infection in a 41-year-old HIV-infected man from Colombia prompted an investigation to determine whether malignant transformation had occurred in the parasite, causing invasive disease in the host.
Initial examination of the patient revealed extensive lymphadenopathy; stool testing yielded H. nana eggs. Disease progressed despite albendazole and antiretroviral therapy, and the patient died. Researchers performed numerous studies on samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies.
PCR screening demonstrated 99% sequence homology with H. nana. Further analysis supported a cestode origin of the cells. Genomic sequencing demonstrated H. nana variants that were consistent with mutations seen in cancer.
Descriptors such as "diagnostic conundrum," "surprising," and "unexpectedly" are rarely seen in case reports. The apparent novelty of this case and the extensive laboratory work performed in this unique investigation make me wonder whether host-related malignant transformation of H. nana might have occurred previously but not been recognized. Should a retrospective analysis of tissue from other immunocompromised hosts be performed?
- See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/fw110816/2015/11/05/malignant-tapeworm-cells-invade-human-host?query=pfwTOC&jwd=000012045846&jspc=CLP#sthash.V2U8uEMo.dpuf

Malignant Tapeworm Cells Invade Human Host


By Larry M. Baddour, MD
Dr. Baddour is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.
A case report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that cells from a tapeworm could undergo malignant transformation and ultimately invade a human host's tissue.
Hymenolepis nana is a human tapeworm that can complete its life cycle in the small intestine; infection can proliferate for years. Development of extraintestinal H. nana infection in a 41-year-old HIV-infected man from Colombia prompted an investigation to determine whether malignant transformation had occurred in the parasite, causing invasive disease in the host.
Initial examination of the patient revealed extensive lymphadenopathy; stool testing yielded H. nana eggs. Disease progressed despite albendazole and antiretroviral therapy, and the patient died. Researchers performed numerous studies on samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies.
PCR screening demonstrated 99% sequence homology with H. nana. Further analysis supported a cestode origin of the cells. Genomic sequencing demonstrated H. nana variants that were consistent with mutations seen in cancer.
Descriptors such as "diagnostic conundrum," "surprising," and "unexpectedly" are rarely seen in case reports. The apparent novelty of this case and the extensive laboratory work performed in this unique investigation make me wonder whether host-related malignant transformation of H. nana might have occurred previously but not been recognized. Should a retrospective analysis of tissue from other immunocompromised hosts be performed?
- See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/fw110816/2015/11/05/malignant-tapeworm-cells-invade-human-host?query=pfwTOC&jwd=000012045846&jspc=CLP#sthash.V2U8uEMo.dpuf

Malignant Tapeworm Cells Invade Human Host


By Larry M. Baddour, MD
Dr. Baddour is editor-in-chief of NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, from which this story was adapted. See full coverage at the link below.
A case report in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests that cells from a tapeworm could undergo malignant transformation and ultimately invade a human host's tissue.
Hymenolepis nana is a human tapeworm that can complete its life cycle in the small intestine; infection can proliferate for years. Development of extraintestinal H. nana infection in a 41-year-old HIV-infected man from Colombia prompted an investigation to determine whether malignant transformation had occurred in the parasite, causing invasive disease in the host.
Initial examination of the patient revealed extensive lymphadenopathy; stool testing yielded H. nana eggs. Disease progressed despite albendazole and antiretroviral therapy, and the patient died. Researchers performed numerous studies on samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies.
PCR screening demonstrated 99% sequence homology with H. nana. Further analysis supported a cestode origin of the cells. Genomic sequencing demonstrated H. nana variants that were consistent with mutations seen in cancer.
Descriptors such as "diagnostic conundrum," "surprising," and "unexpectedly" are rarely seen in case reports. The apparent novelty of this case and the extensive laboratory work performed in this unique investigation make me wonder whether host-related malignant transformation of H. nana might have occurred previously but not been recognized. Should a retrospective analysis of tissue from other immunocompromised hosts be performed?
- See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/fw110816/2015/11/05/malignant-tapeworm-cells-invade-human-host?query=pfwTOC&jwd=000012045846&jspc=CLP#sthash.V2U8uEMo.dpuf

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